The Return of the Historical Novel?

Thinking About Fiction and History After Historiographic Metafiction


40,00 € *

1. Edition, 2017
208 Pages

ISBN: 978-3-8253-7693-2
Product: Ebook
Edition: PDF
Subject: Anglistik/Amerikanistik
Series: Britannica et Americana. 3. Folge, Volume No.: 33
Available: 17.01.2017

Keywords: Historischer Roman, Metafiktion, Autorschaft, Fowles, John, Barnes, Julian, Swift, Graham, Scott, Walter, Coetzee, J. M., McEwan, Ian, Geschichtsfiktion, Crace, Jim, Vassanji, M. G., Cromwell, Thomas


Until recently, the critical reception of historical fiction was dominated by two theoretical paradigms: György Lukács’s Marxist view and Linda Hutcheon’s concept of ‘historiographic metafiction’. We are now entering a new phase as the discussion of the historical novel is rapidly becoming more inclusive, more tolerant and, above all, more diverse. It is before the backdrop of these changes in the critical debate that the contributions to this volume are meant to be read. Rather than seeing historical fiction as locked in a clear-cut scheme of teleological succession or assigning to the historical novel specific aesthetic purposes, the articles in this collection seek to probe deeply into the historical novelʼs potential for providing readers not simply with an understanding of how the image of the past is constructed but also of how attempts to chart forms of historical otherness constitute a specific mode of cultural experience mediated by literature.

This desire for a literary experience of historical otherness has recently increased in urgency, even if the historical authenticity one might nostalgically associate with such a project must always elude us. Authors discussed include Walter Scott, John Fowles, Graham Swift, M. J. Vassanji, J. M. Coetzee, Peter Ackroyd, Alan Massie, Julian Barnes, Ian McEwan, Hilary Mantel and Jim Crace.

 
 
 

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Hannah Pardey in: Anglistik, 29.2 (2018), 164ff

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