A decade after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, over 160 novels by U.S.-American writers have re-enacted or revised the day we now call ‘9/11’. This study systematically charts the rich subgenre of Ground Zero Fiction by exploring its formal, structural, thematic, and functional dimensions. In a combination of typological survey and detailed analysis, both familiar texts (by Jonathan Safran Foer, Don DeLillo, or John Updike) and lesser-known approaches (by writers such as Karen Kingsbury, Laila Halaby, Nicholas Rinaldi, Helen Schulman, or Ronald Sukenick) are investigated for their specific engagements with contemporary history. The American 9/11 novel, this volume argues, not only provides a productive testing ground for narrative crisis management, but it serves as an exemplary twenty-first century interface between historical and fictional representation, between ethical and aesthetic responsibilities, and between national and transnational formations of identity.

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Greg Wersching in: Journal of American Studies, 46.3 (2012), E58

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Birte Otten in: Zeitschrift für Anglistik und Amerikanistik, Vol. 61.1 (2013), 102ff

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Katharina Donn in: Anglia, Bd. 130 (2012), Heft 4, 583ff

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Sien Uytterschout in: Amerikastudien / American Studies, 57, 1 (2012), 145ff

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Marek Paryż in: Polish Journal for American Studies, Vol. 6 (2012), 130ff

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Anneka Esch-van Kan in: KULT_online, 32 (2012) [http://kult-online.uni-giessen.de/wps/pgn/home/KULT_online/32-6]

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David Simpson in: Modern Language Quarterly, 73.2 (2012), 251ff